Friday, May 18, 2012

lost and found






10 comments:

  1. At our age, forever old might be more appropriate.

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  2. Love this song...takes me back to when I really was young!!! Deb S.

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    1. deb, you still are, in galaxy years!

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  3. I'll settle for just forever.

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    1. kirk, what would you want forever?

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    2. I've come to a couple of conclusion about life. One, it zips along much, much too quickly, and, two, it's much, much too easy to waste. But all the bad decisions that one is capable of, and the average human has a lot of capability in that regard, means squat in you have an eternity to recover from them.

      If I can't live forever, then, as consolation, I'll settle for the average lifespan, but one in which I make no mistakes, go down no blind alleys, and am never sidetracked. But it's already two late for that.

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    3. That should be TOO late.

      Talk about mistakes!

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    4. this brings up so many possible interesting avenues of thought, it could go on for eternity! i think the only really bad decisions we make are the ones we KNOW at the time are bad, and we do it anyway. you know, when we completely disregard that little, or not so little, voice saying, "WHAT ARE YOU THINKING?"
      aside from those, i think we make the best decisions we can at that moment, given what we know, or don't know. so it always comes down to, pay attention.

      if we made no mistakes, would that mean we are perfect?

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  4. Well, it'd sure be a long way toward perfection.

    You're right, we make mistakes not knowing they're mistakes, based on the best information, as well as our own mind-set, at the time. Still have to live with the consequences, though.

    As for the other kind you mention, the kind where the little voice warns you you're making a mistake, and you go ahead and make it anyway, there's a word for that. It's called PASSION.

    Late in his life, Orson Welles gave an interview where he admitted he had wasted his life. Many who viewed his commercial work ("there shall be no wine before its time") would agree. He said he spent too much time trying to secure funding to make movies on his own terms, when he should have just stayed in the theater, where he was always assured a degree of independence. Yet he couldn't say he regretted wasting his life in such a way. It was, he said, like falling in love and then getting your heart broken. You don't regret what you do for love.

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